A Tradition That Was Started Two Generations Ago Is Still Alive And Popular

Communalism has been a part of our history for centuries, the thing that was started with British, has been further torn apart by the beliefs of right wings and fundamentalist. The words 'communal tension' keeps coming up in the news, but what we really need to see is some communal harmony. Despite most ideas, we do often witness moments of unity and brotherhood between the Hindus and Muslims in India, like the one below.

On 20th of September, Indian Shiites commemorated Ashura, which is a day of mourning that honors the martyrdom of the Imam Husain, grandson of the Prophet Mohammad, who was supposedly killed at the 7th century Battle of Karbala. That historical event is remembered annually through processions involving enacting plays known as the ta'ziyeh or taziya, lamentation, wailing and self-flagellation.

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In Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh spectators are treated with an unusual community of mourners. These mourners carry out their own taziya procession and beat their chests in lamentation. But to everybody's surprise these unusual mourners are actually Hindus headed by Rakesh Gupta.

It all started with Rakesh's grandfather, a devout Hindu himself- after his prayers for a baby boy were answered- he started distributing ‘tabarruk’ to his Muslim brothers every year in his locality. He even named his son Fakeerchandra. This tradition became so famous that people started calling it "Luttas" a local slang for event celebrated for wish fulfillment. What started off as a small offering by a thankful man, it soon started attracting people from neighboring localities and even districts.

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Although every year this even is celebrated amidst tight police security but so far no unfortunate incident has taken place despite the fact that people jostle over the tabarruk (something sacred) like fruits, sweets and other eatables that are distributed from the rooftops of the houses.

According to Khadim Abbas, convener of the Qaumi Tehaffuz Committee, Etawah, even during pre-independence era Luttas was observe by people from different caste and cultures even British officers are known to attend such events.


Picture Source: Times of India ;  India Tv

 


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