An NRI Who Built £60 Million-Empire From Zero, Now Works For Punjab Villages

The world is run on money, be it the government, your school, college, workplace, or even a place of religious worship. Every day, the stock market witnesses tons of people going into depression for the losses they make, whilst an equal number of people celebrate their day because of their profits. The aim is to make money, but what after you’ve achieved that?  What’s the next step? Making money is not the destination, is it?

Lord Diljit Rana, 80, from Sanghol, a historical village located in Fatehgarh Sahib District of Punjab, India, is changing the lives of many youths. He has been facilitating them with quality education, especially those located in the region’s rural belt and it’s remote villages.

Diljit belongs to a refugee family from Lyallpur, now in Pakistan, that saw the great partition of 1947. His family was possession-less when they first reached the Indian state. He left for England in 1955, and then moved to Belfast, Northern Ireland in 1966 and has been a resident of the city ever since. With years of toil and turmoil, he worked his way to the top and built himself a £60 million business empire dealing in restaurants, hotels, and trading. He is now a successful hotelier, property designer, and the president of the Northern Ireland Chamber of Commerce and Industry, and a true Indian honorary consul in Belfast.

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Although he has reached sky high with his success in all that he has undertaken, his roots still remain grounded into the clayey grounds of his mother land. With a wish to give back to society and help his kind, he launched an education project in rural Punjab as a noteworthy initiative. The Lord Rana Edu- City is spread massively across 27 acres, offering a diverse banquet of courses to choose from, like business management, hospitality and tourism management, agriculture, education, vocational training, and skill development.

“I decided to bring quality education in Punjab’s rural belt as the majority of the students from the villages did not have the means to go and pursue higher studies. Our first college started functioning in 2005. We now have six colleges, offering graduate and post-graduate courses,” said Diljit, member of the British House of Lords. He chose Sanghol in particular to set up his educational institutions as his beloved mother, Jwala Devi, belonged to that village. The project involved a lot of commitment, time, capital, planning, legal clearances, and the right execution. It is indeed challenging to teach and educate the kids coming from the neighboring rural localities.

“Punjab has gone backwards. In the 1970’s, it was the most prosperous and forward looking state but since the 1980’s, it is stuck in the phase of Green Revolution while the rest of the world has moved on. In 10 years most vehicles in western cities will be driver less, while Punjab is yet to take the industrial route,” says the business veteran.

Diljit juggles between business and philanthropy, helping and supporting those in need. He is honored and immensely respected for the noble deeds that he has been doing. May his visions become reality and his students make him proud by reaping the fruits of their hard work.The world is run on money, be it the government, your school, college, workplace, or even a place of religious worship. Every day, the stock market witnesses tons of people going into depression for the losses they make, whilst an equal number of people celebrate their day because of their profits. The aim is to make money, but what after you’ve achieved that?  What’s the next step? Making money is not the destination, is it?

Lord Diljit Rana, 80, from Sanghol, a historical village located in Fatehgarh Sahib District of Punjab, India, is changing the lives of many youths. He has been facilitating them with quality education, especially those located in the region’s rural belt and it’s remote villages.

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Diljit belongs to a refugee family from Lyallpur, now in Pakistan, that saw the great partition of 1947. His family was possession-less when they first reached the Indian state. He left for England in 1955, and then moved to Belfast, Northern Ireland in 1966 and has been a resident of the city ever since. With years of toil and turmoil, he worked his way to the top and built himself a £60 million business empire dealing in restaurants, hotels, and trading. He is now a successful hotelier, property designer, and the president of the Northern Ireland Chamber of Commerce and Industry, and a true Indian honorary consul in Belfast.

Although he has reached sky high with his success in all that he has undertaken, his roots still remain grounded into the clayey grounds of his mother land. With a wish to give back to society and help his kind, he launched an education project in rural Punjab as a noteworthy initiative. The Lord Rana Edu- City is spread massively across 27 acres, offering a diverse banquet of courses to choose from, like business management, hospitality and tourism management, agriculture, education, vocational training, and skill development.

“I decided to bring quality education in Punjab’s rural belt as the majority of the students from the villages did not have the means to go and pursue higher studies. Our first college started functioning in 2005. We now have six colleges, offering graduate and post-graduate courses,” said Diljit, member of the British House of Lords. He chose Sanghol in particular to set up his educational institutions as his beloved mother, Jwala Devi, belonged to that village. The project involved a lot of commitment, time, capital, planning, legal clearances, and the right execution. It is indeed challenging to teach and educate the kids coming from the neighboring rural localities.

“Punjab has gone backwards. In the 1970’s, it was the most prosperous and forward looking state but since the 1980’s, it is stuck in the phase of Green Revolution while the rest of the world has moved on. In 10 years most vehicles in western cities will be driver less, while Punjab is yet to take the industrial route,” says the business veteran.

Diljit juggles between business and philanthropy, helping and supporting those in need. He is honored and immensely respected for the noble deeds that he has been doing. May his visions become reality and his students make him proud by reaping the fruits of their hard work.The world is run on money, be it the government, your school, college, workplace, or even a place of religious worship. Every day, the stock market witnesses tons of people going into depression for the losses they make, whilst an equal number of people celebrate their day because of their profits. The aim is to make money, but what after you’ve achieved that?  What’s the next step? Making money is not the destination, is it?

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Lord Diljit Rana, 80, from Sanghol, a historical village located in Fatehgarh Sahib District of Punjab, India, is changing the lives of many youths. He has been facilitating them with quality education, especially those located in the region’s rural belt and it’s remote villages.

Diljit belongs to a refugee family from Lyallpur, now in Pakistan, that saw the great partition of 1947. His family was possession-less when they first reached the Indian state. He left for England in 1955, and then moved to Belfast, Northern Ireland in 1966 and has been a resident of the city ever since. With years of toil and turmoil, he worked his way to the top and built himself a £60 million business empire dealing in restaurants, hotels, and trading. He is now a successful hotelier, property designer, and the president of the Northern Ireland Chamber of Commerce and Industry, and a true Indian honorary consul in Belfast.

Although he has reached sky high with his success in all that he has undertaken, his roots still remain grounded into the clayey grounds of his mother land. With a wish to give back to society and help his kind, he launched an education project in rural Punjab as a noteworthy initiative. The Lord Rana Edu- City is spread massively across 27 acres, offering a diverse banquet of courses to choose from, like business management, hospitality and tourism management, agriculture, education, vocational training, and skill development.

“I decided to bring quality education in Punjab’s rural belt as the majority of the students from the villages did not have the means to go and pursue higher studies. Our first college started functioning in 2005. We now have six colleges, offering graduate and post-graduate courses,” said Diljit, member of the British House of Lords. He chose Sanghol in particular to set up his educational institutions as his beloved mother, Jwala Devi, belonged to that village. The project involved a lot of commitment, time, capital, planning, legal clearances, and the right execution. It is indeed challenging to teach and educate the kids coming from the neighboring rural localities.

“Punjab has gone backwards. In the 1970’s, it was the most prosperous and forward looking state but since the 1980’s, it is stuck in the phase of Green Revolution while the rest of the world has moved on. In 10 years most vehicles in western cities will be driver less, while Punjab is yet to take the industrial route,” says the business veteran.

Diljit juggles between business and philanthropy, helping and supporting those in need. He is honored and immensely respected for the noble deeds that he has been doing. May his visions become reality and his students make him proud by reaping the fruits of their hard work.

(By Declan Rego)

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